IBM Wants to Cut Legal Protection for Internet Companies

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) on Wednesday threw its support behind enacting a new policy to restrict liability protections enjoyed by internet platforms such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Twitter Inc., and Facebook Inc.

Ryan Hagemann, an IBM government and regulatory affairs technology policy government, stated in a blog post that internet firms shouldn’t automatically have legal protection for what third events publish on their platforms. Instead, their liability exemption — part of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act — must be primarily based on the condition they take action to curb harmful makes use of of their services, he stated.

“A measure designed almost quarter-century in the past to foster an infant internet to preserve pace with the big social, financial, and even political power that the online world at present commands,” Hagemann wrote.

The comments from IBM add an industry voice to a rising checklist of advocates and lawmakers in Washington who support paring back the legal exemption for tech firms struggling to curb the proliferation of fake content, hate speech and election meddling on their platforms.

On Tuesday, Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) mentioned he would like to collect best practices from business, government and the nonprofit sector after which recurrently audit firms’ compliance as the premise for granting legal responsibility safety. Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) launched a bill last month that may require the most significant tech firms to show they treat content in a politically neutral way before they may benefit from the legal shield.